AMD Ryzen 3 3300 Zen 2 6-Core 12-Thread CPU Makes Benchmark Cameo Appearance – Hot Hardware

AMD Ryzen 3 3300 Zen 2 6-Core 12-Thread CPU Makes Benchmark Cameo Appearance – Hot Hardware

Ryzen

AMD

Zen 2

mania is an all-time high, and it looks as though we’re getting a glimpse at what the company could be offering at the low-end of the 

Ryzen 3000

 desktop processor family. New Geekbench numbers have appeared ahead of

AMD

‘s official launch, and they depict a 6-core, 12-thread processor with the codename Matisse (which of course is Zen 2).

Before we get into the actual performance numbers, this processor has a base clock of 3.2GHz and a boost frequency of 4GHz. If we look back at previous leaked coverage of AMD’s Ryzen 3000 family, this appears to match exactly with the Ryzen 3 3300 that we reported on back in early March, and the chip is expected to be priced around the $100 mark.

geekbench amd zen2

Moving on to the actual performance figures, this alleged Ryzen 3 3300 is putting up a single-core score of 5061 and a multi-core score of 25481. For comparison, in our own testing, we got single- and multi-core scores of 4815 and 25371 respectively for the current flagship octa-core Ryzen 7 2700X processor.

Think about that for a moment; the entry-level Ryzen 3 3300 is slightly outpacing the fastest available, current-generation Ryzen 2000-class desktop processor. Now this is of course just a single benchmark and likely won’t be indicative of the Ryzen 3 3000 performance in all situations, but it does paint a very compelling picture for AMD’s 7nm processors. It will also give Intel a run for its money and further incentive to keep up efforts to hasten production of its 10nm products

CVN X570 gaming pro
Colorful CVN X570 Gaming Pro Motherboard

AMD is expected to officially announce its Ryzen 3000 family of processors either this coming week at Computex 2019 or sometime prior to E3. If the previous reports are accurate, there will be 6-core/12-thread, 8-core/16-thread, 12-core/24-thread and 16-core/32-thread SKUs to choose from. 

These new Ryzen 3000 processors will launch alongside AMD’s new X570 chipset, which brings native support for PCIe 4.0. We’ve already seen a slew of X570-based motherboards leaked over the past month, and we’re expecting to see official announcements from the usual suspects over the coming weeks.

Tua Tagovailoa had an ‘awesome’ time playing Call of Duty with Trevor Lawrence | College Football – ESPN

Tua Tagovailoa had an ‘awesome’ time playing Call of Duty with Trevor Lawrence | College Football – ESPN



Published on May 25, 2019

Tua Tagovailoa speaks with ESPN’s Ed Aschoff during the Steve Clarkson Quarterback Retreat about recovering from Alabama’s loss to Clemson in the 2019 College Football Playoff National Championship, learning from new offensive coordinator Steve Sarkisian, and (3:20) playing Call of Duty with Clemson quarterback Trevor Lawrence.

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Fire takes hold at Lewis Center substation – NBC4i.com

Fire takes hold at Lewis Center substation – NBC4i.com

Invisible placeholder

Lewis Center, OH (WCMH) – A fire caught hold at an electrical substation this evening, Delaware County Sheriff radio room confirmed this evening.

The fire began at about 7:04pm on Sunday night, and still occupied crews an hour later. It affects the sub station at 7547 Green Meadows Drive North.

Neighbors were able to see the flames. No people were injured in the blaze, the sheriff’s office confirmed.

An AEP spokesperson said that the fire had been contained but it will continue to burn. However only a couple of customers — if any — are affected.

“It’s a transmission substation, so it feeds distribution lines, but we’ve transferred loads over to other lines,” the spokesperson explained.

Video sent to NBC by viewer Lisa Chaffin-Murphy.

Man dies after falling off roof of east Lincoln home – 1011now

Man dies after falling off roof of east Lincoln home – 1011now

OnePlus 7 Pro Review: Risky Gamble Pays Off With Stunning Killer Flagship – Forbes

OnePlus 7 Pro Review: Risky Gamble Pays Off With Stunning Killer Flagship – Forbes

its first handset was announced in 2014, OnePlus has been the masters of balancing cost against functionality. By building up a reputation of matching other flagship smartphones but at a mid-range price, it gathered a legion of fans. The last twelve months have seen the Shenzhen-based company work on breaking into the mainstream market, and the result is the OnePlus 7 Pro.

But the OnePlus 7 Pro has a new way of approaching the balance point. By deciding to compromise on the ‘mid-range’ target and gambling on a higher list price of $699, OnePlus has taken a risk that a little bit more headroom to bring more technology and features into its prime smartphone will pay off. Couple that with its traditionally aggressive approach to ‘cost vs hardware’ and you have a handset that can comfortably challenge the likes of the Samsung’s Galaxy S10 family and Apple’s iPhone XS portfolio.

OnePlus 7 Pro (image: Ewan Spence)

Ewan Spence

I’ve been using a OnePlus 7 Pro review unit for the last week to get a better understanding of the device. There are still some areas to explore in more detail over the next few weeks (such as the camera) so expect more long-term thoughts during June. For now I want to look at the overall impression of the handset and the three key areas that define the 7 Pro; the large and fast display, design decisions around the front- and rear-cameras, and the battery and charging options.

Let’s start with the display, and the obvious missing feature. OnePlus has turned the block back a few years are there’s no sign of a notch, punched-out hole, or any trimmed pixels to accommodate the front facing camera. Pair that touch with the much smaller bezels at the top and bottom of the screen and the curved edges leading ito the edge of the handset, and you have a smartphone which is getting closer and closer to an ‘all-screen’ forward facing aspect.

OnePlus 7 Pro (image: Ewan Spence)

Ewan Spence

While the lack of a notch will drive the headlines, it’s the use of the curved edges on the screen and the obvious comparison to the Galaxy S handsets that visually lifts the OnePlus 7 Pro’s challenger credentials. This touch changes both the look and feel of the device and it screams ‘high-end’ in a way that no other recent OnePlus handset has managed.

Practically it’s a little bit more awkward. Like Samsung’s Galaxy S handsets, the curved edge offers more reflections from ambient light and unless you are looking at the screen in an exact and unnatural orientation there will be optical distortions to any straight lines across the display. Most of the time these never registered with me, but there are occasions – full screen video in Netflix or YouTube being obvious case,  – where it feels ever so slightly uncomfortable and the curved edges pick up some awkward reflections.

OnePlus is not alone in suffering these issues, they apply to any smartphone with a curved screen. Anyone stepping up to match the competition means they will suffer similar issues

Curves aside, the screen is gorgeous. The 6.67 inch display has a resolution of 3120×1440 pixels (QHD+) with an aspect ratio of 19.5:9. This is not a phone that is exclusively for single handed use, there’s just too much real estate to stretch your thumb over. Thankfully the 7 Pro wins out not because of the size (it’s not the only big display out there) but the quality. I’ve already highlighted the resolution, but this OLED screen is really bright and staying with the default ‘vivid’ color setting offers you a screen that bristles with popping colors. Alternatively you can switch it to an sRGB or P3 screen, with other customizations available.

Then there’s the refresh rate. This is a relatively new technology for smartphones – 60Hz refresh is the norm but we’ve seen higher refresh rates on devices like the iPad Pro and the Razer Phone 2. OnePlus’ 90Hz refresh rate on the 7 Pro makes everything run much more smoothly when scrolling, navigating the UI and when your touch is echoed with any on-screen action.

To help with battery life and UI speed, the OnePlus 7 Pro can dynamically alter the resolution and the refresh rate as required – so your 1080p YouTube video is not going to be running the same configuration as your massive full screen RPG.

The other feature on the screen – or under the screen – is the fingerprint reader. Following the lead of the OnePlus 6T, OnePlus has continued to use an optical fingerprint reader under the screen. Although some manufacturers have found these to be hit and miss, I found the 6T implementation to be fast and accurate, with a large enough target area that unlocking with a finger or thumb was achieved with ease. The OnePlus 7 Pro continues this tradition.

OnePlus 7 Pro (image: Ewan Spence)

Ewan Spence

I suspect I’ll be using the fingerprint unlocking a lot more on the 7 Pro than the 6T. Although both handsets also feature facial recognition, the 6T’s forward facing camera was always available, mounted in the teardrop shaped notch on last year’s handset. For the 7 Pro, the selfie camera is tucked out of sight until it is needed. When it is required, the motorised mechanism lifts the camera into position, and tucks it away when no longer needed (or when it detects the phone is falling, in which case it quickly retreats back into the case as a safety precaution).

It gives the phone some much-needed physical identity, but it means the ease of facial recognition is gone. You need to swipe up with your thumb to open up the camera, at which point you might as well use the fingerprint sensor.

OnePlus has also upped the imaging stakes for the main camera,using the popular triple-lens Sony IMX586 CMOS system, which can be found in a number of modern flagship smartphones. OnePlus is using a f/1.6 48 megapixel main camera (which outputs 12 megapixel images by default, oversampling the pixels to create a ‘fusion’ of image data), a 117 degree f/2.2 wide angle lens, and a f/2.4 telephoto lens.

OnePlus 7 Pro (image: Ewan Spence)

Ewan Spence

I’ve not given the cameras a full workout yet (as noted that OnePlus is going to be updating the camera software in the next week so expect a full review on the imaging when that drops). The camera is far from weak, but in a package where every element is easily above average the camera software is the weakest point.

I think part of that is down to a more natural look in the pictures. There’s less contrast and a notable bias away from vivid colors in the images. This should make for great prints of your pictures, but they do not  pop out of the 7 Pro’s screen. OnePlus’ software choice from the automatic modes needed a little bit of calibration from the public, hence the upcoming update. We are talking about very fine details and decisions here. For day to day use pictures and videos are excellent and the images produced match the expectations of a $700 smartphone… but OnePlus is directly challenging much more expensive smartphones, so the camera software needs that extra edge to be seen as an equal to the Galaxys and iPhones of the world.

OnePlus 7 Pro sample image – full scale crop in lower right (Photo: Ewan Spence)

Ewan Spence

Certainly the core specifications make the OnePlus 7 Pro an equal of these leading handsets. The heart of the handset is Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 855 system on chip. My review unit came with 256 GB of onboard storage – there’s no microSD support – and a whopping 12 GB of RAM (12GB /128GB and 8GB/128GB variants are also available). The extra memory certainly helps while switching programs and no doubt comes into play with the higher resolution and faster refresh rate on the screen.

The Android-powered Oxygen OS may be aggressive in keeping memory free, but there’s enough space for my popular apps to stay open and quick to switch to, while lesser apps open smartly without fuss.

Two prominently advertised features have been added to the OS. The first is a full screen capture and recording mode which also allows you to record voiceovers, expect streamers and reviewers to make full use of this. The other is Zen Mode, which locks out almost all of the phone’s functionality for 20 minutes, leaving you just the camera, and the ability make and receive calls… the idea being you can ‘switch off’ from the digital world for a short period of time. It makes for great copy but is it a major selling point?

OnePlus 7 Pro (image: Ewan Spence)

Ewan Spence

You can’t get away from the fact that the OnePlus 7 Pro is a big handset. Even with the minimal bezels around the screen the handset is near the upper limit of ‘big smartphone’ and you are going to be using this as a two-handed smart[hone for much of the time. But OnePlus has made good use of the extra volume, notably by pushing a 4000 mAh battery into the chassis.

Couple the large battery with the aggressive power-saving code in Oxygen OS and you have a handset that not only makes it comfortably through a working day, but last well into a second day of use without charging. No doubt there are power benchmark numbers out there that show this, but my real word test of ‘does it make it through my day without getting worried’ is easily passed.

If you do need to top up the battery, then OnePlus’ ‘Warp Charge 30’ fast charging system, which debuted in a special edition of the OnePlus 6T last year, is present in the 7 Pro. This promises ‘a day’s power in thirty minutes’ from the 30 watt charger (delivering 5 volts at 6 amps). From zero to full takes around 80 minutes, but you’re looking at around sixty percent charge in the aforementioned thirty minutes.

But to get that fast charge you need to be using OnePlus’ own charger, because much of the circuitry needed is in the charger and not in the handset. You can still use a regular USB-C charger for the OnePlus 7 Pro, you just don’t get the speedy charging.

What’s not here is wireless charging. Long-time readers will know I’m a big fan of this, but they’ll also know that OnePlus has decided to prioritise a fast cabled charge over the convenience of sipping on power throughout the day from a charging pad. Both offer confidence that you can make it from dawn till dusk (and beyond). While I would rather see both options implemented, the OnePlus 7 Pro still has a low price point to meet, and I can understand the decision process that would lead to a lack of wireless charging and a focus on faster wired charging.

I’m less forgiving about the lack of an IP rating for the device. Again this is about consumer confidence. OnePlus can happily show off a 7 Pro being immersed in water and suggest that IP ratings do not reflect real world conditions… but IP ratings are something that consumers have an affinity with. The lack of an IP rating does not come over as ‘waterproof but in a different way’, it comes over as ‘not waterproof’, especially when the handset is sitting on a retail shelf on the high street, rather than being sold to a dedicated OnePlus fan online.

I can live without wireless charging and I can even (grudgingly) live without a 3.5mm headphone jack (even though I feel forced into it by the industry). Neither of these are deal breakers for consumers. But waterproofing? If OnePlus is going to take on the behemoths at the top of the food chain, then it needs to do it with no gaps in its armour – and the lack of an IP rating is a gap.

With the OnePlus 7 Pro, OnePlus has made a conscious decision to fight first on features, then on price. Previously it felt that OnePlus put price marginally before performance… here it is the other way around. While the price is notably higher than previous OnePlus handsets, that extra capacity has allowed the team to step up its game and design a handset that rivals the top tier from other manufacturers while still being seen as a competitively priced flagship.

For consumers more focused on price the OnePlus 7 is expected to be the direct successor to the OnePlus 6 and OnePlus 6T, and be in a similar price bracket. But if you are looking for the latest technology in a refreshing design, with the latest features and a strong history in software support, the OnePlus 7 Pro is fighting to be at the top of your list.

Now read more about OnePlus’ plans in my exclusive interview with co-founder Carl Pei…

Disclaimer: OnePlus supplied a OnePlus 7 Pro for review purposes.

“>

Since its first handset was announced in 2014, OnePlus has been the masters of balancing cost against functionality. By building up a reputation of matching other flagship smartphones but at a mid-range price, it gathered a legion of fans. The last twelve months have seen the Shenzhen-based company work on breaking into the mainstream market, and the result is the OnePlus 7 Pro.

But the OnePlus 7 Pro has a new way of approaching the balance point. By deciding to compromise on the ‘mid-range’ target and gambling on a higher list price of $699, OnePlus has taken a risk that a little bit more headroom to bring more technology and features into its prime smartphone will pay off. Couple that with its traditionally aggressive approach to ‘cost vs hardware’ and you have a handset that can comfortably challenge the likes of the Samsung’s Galaxy S10 family and Apple’s iPhone XS portfolio.

OnePlus 7 Pro (image: Ewan Spence)

Ewan Spence

I’ve been using a OnePlus 7 Pro review unit for the last week to get a better understanding of the device. There are still some areas to explore in more detail over the next few weeks (such as the camera) so expect more long-term thoughts during June. For now I want to look at the overall impression of the handset and the three key areas that define the 7 Pro; the large and fast display, design decisions around the front- and rear-cameras, and the battery and charging options.

Let’s start with the display, and the obvious missing feature. OnePlus has turned the block back a few years are there’s no sign of a notch, punched-out hole, or any trimmed pixels to accommodate the front facing camera. Pair that touch with the much smaller bezels at the top and bottom of the screen and the curved edges leading ito the edge of the handset, and you have a smartphone which is getting closer and closer to an ‘all-screen’ forward facing aspect.

OnePlus 7 Pro (image: Ewan Spence)

Ewan Spence

While the lack of a notch will drive the headlines, it’s the use of the curved edges on the screen and the obvious comparison to the Galaxy S handsets that visually lifts the OnePlus 7 Pro’s challenger credentials. This touch changes both the look and feel of the device and it screams ‘high-end’ in a way that no other recent OnePlus handset has managed.

Practically it’s a little bit more awkward. Like Samsung’s Galaxy S handsets, the curved edge offers more reflections from ambient light and unless you are looking at the screen in an exact and unnatural orientation there will be optical distortions to any straight lines across the display. Most of the time these never registered with me, but there are occasions – full screen video in Netflix or YouTube being obvious case,  – where it feels ever so slightly uncomfortable and the curved edges pick up some awkward reflections.

OnePlus is not alone in suffering these issues, they apply to any smartphone with a curved screen. Anyone stepping up to match the competition means they will suffer similar issues

Curves aside, the screen is gorgeous. The 6.67 inch display has a resolution of 3120×1440 pixels (QHD+) with an aspect ratio of 19.5:9. This is not a phone that is exclusively for single handed use, there’s just too much real estate to stretch your thumb over. Thankfully the 7 Pro wins out not because of the size (it’s not the only big display out there) but the quality. I’ve already highlighted the resolution, but this OLED screen is really bright and staying with the default ‘vivid’ color setting offers you a screen that bristles with popping colors. Alternatively you can switch it to an sRGB or P3 screen, with other customizations available.

Then there’s the refresh rate. This is a relatively new technology for smartphones – 60Hz refresh is the norm but we’ve seen higher refresh rates on devices like the iPad Pro and the Razer Phone 2. OnePlus’ 90Hz refresh rate on the 7 Pro makes everything run much more smoothly when scrolling, navigating the UI and when your touch is echoed with any on-screen action.

To help with battery life and UI speed, the OnePlus 7 Pro can dynamically alter the resolution and the refresh rate as required – so your 1080p YouTube video is not going to be running the same configuration as your massive full screen RPG.

The other feature on the screen – or under the screen – is the fingerprint reader. Following the lead of the OnePlus 6T, OnePlus has continued to use an optical fingerprint reader under the screen. Although some manufacturers have found these to be hit and miss, I found the 6T implementation to be fast and accurate, with a large enough target area that unlocking with a finger or thumb was achieved with ease. The OnePlus 7 Pro continues this tradition.

OnePlus 7 Pro (image: Ewan Spence)

Ewan Spence

I suspect I’ll be using the fingerprint unlocking a lot more on the 7 Pro than the 6T. Although both handsets also feature facial recognition, the 6T’s forward facing camera was always available, mounted in the teardrop shaped notch on last year’s handset. For the 7 Pro, the selfie camera is tucked out of sight until it is needed. When it is required, the motorised mechanism lifts the camera into position, and tucks it away when no longer needed (or when it detects the phone is falling, in which case it quickly retreats back into the case as a safety precaution).

It gives the phone some much-needed physical identity, but it means the ease of facial recognition is gone. You need to swipe up with your thumb to open up the camera, at which point you might as well use the fingerprint sensor.

OnePlus has also upped the imaging stakes for the main camera,using the popular triple-lens Sony IMX586 CMOS system, which can be found in a number of modern flagship smartphones. OnePlus is using a f/1.6 48 megapixel main camera (which outputs 12 megapixel images by default, oversampling the pixels to create a ‘fusion’ of image data), a 117 degree f/2.2 wide angle lens, and a f/2.4 telephoto lens.

OnePlus 7 Pro (image: Ewan Spence)

Ewan Spence

I’ve not given the cameras a full workout yet (as noted that OnePlus is going to be updating the camera software in the next week so expect a full review on the imaging when that drops). The camera is far from weak, but in a package where every element is easily above average the camera software is the weakest point.

I think part of that is down to a more natural look in the pictures. There’s less contrast and a notable bias away from vivid colors in the images. This should make for great prints of your pictures, but they do not  pop out of the 7 Pro’s screen. OnePlus’ software choice from the automatic modes needed a little bit of calibration from the public, hence the upcoming update. We are talking about very fine details and decisions here. For day to day use pictures and videos are excellent and the images produced match the expectations of a $700 smartphone… but OnePlus is directly challenging much more expensive smartphones, so the camera software needs that extra edge to be seen as an equal to the Galaxys and iPhones of the world.

OnePlus 7 Pro sample image – full scale crop in lower right (Photo: Ewan Spence)

Ewan Spence

Certainly the core specifications make the OnePlus 7 Pro an equal of these leading handsets. The heart of the handset is Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 855 system on chip. My review unit came with 256 GB of onboard storage – there’s no microSD support – and a whopping 12 GB of RAM (12GB /128GB and 8GB/128GB variants are also available). The extra memory certainly helps while switching programs and no doubt comes into play with the higher resolution and faster refresh rate on the screen.

The Android-powered Oxygen OS may be aggressive in keeping memory free, but there’s enough space for my popular apps to stay open and quick to switch to, while lesser apps open smartly without fuss.

Two prominently advertised features have been added to the OS. The first is a full screen capture and recording mode which also allows you to record voiceovers, expect streamers and reviewers to make full use of this. The other is Zen Mode, which locks out almost all of the phone’s functionality for 20 minutes, leaving you just the camera, and the ability make and receive calls… the idea being you can ‘switch off’ from the digital world for a short period of time. It makes for great copy but is it a major selling point?

OnePlus 7 Pro (image: Ewan Spence)

Ewan Spence

You can’t get away from the fact that the OnePlus 7 Pro is a big handset. Even with the minimal bezels around the screen the handset is near the upper limit of ‘big smartphone’ and you are going to be using this as a two-handed smart[hone for much of the time. But OnePlus has made good use of the extra volume, notably by pushing a 4000 mAh battery into the chassis.

Couple the large battery with the aggressive power-saving code in Oxygen OS and you have a handset that not only makes it comfortably through a working day, but last well into a second day of use without charging. No doubt there are power benchmark numbers out there that show this, but my real word test of ‘does it make it through my day without getting worried’ is easily passed.

If you do need to top up the battery, then OnePlus’ ‘Warp Charge 30’ fast charging system, which debuted in a special edition of the OnePlus 6T last year, is present in the 7 Pro. This promises ‘a day’s power in thirty minutes’ from the 30 watt charger (delivering 5 volts at 6 amps). From zero to full takes around 80 minutes, but you’re looking at around sixty percent charge in the aforementioned thirty minutes.

But to get that fast charge you need to be using OnePlus’ own charger, because much of the circuitry needed is in the charger and not in the handset. You can still use a regular USB-C charger for the OnePlus 7 Pro, you just don’t get the speedy charging.

What’s not here is wireless charging. Long-time readers will know I’m a big fan of this, but they’ll also know that OnePlus has decided to prioritise a fast cabled charge over the convenience of sipping on power throughout the day from a charging pad. Both offer confidence that you can make it from dawn till dusk (and beyond). While I would rather see both options implemented, the OnePlus 7 Pro still has a low price point to meet, and I can understand the decision process that would lead to a lack of wireless charging and a focus on faster wired charging.

I’m less forgiving about the lack of an IP rating for the device. Again this is about consumer confidence. OnePlus can happily show off a 7 Pro being immersed in water and suggest that IP ratings do not reflect real world conditions… but IP ratings are something that consumers have an affinity with. The lack of an IP rating does not come over as ‘waterproof but in a different way’, it comes over as ‘not waterproof’, especially when the handset is sitting on a retail shelf on the high street, rather than being sold to a dedicated OnePlus fan online.

I can live without wireless charging and I can even (grudgingly) live without a 3.5mm headphone jack (even though I feel forced into it by the industry). Neither of these are deal breakers for consumers. But waterproofing? If OnePlus is going to take on the behemoths at the top of the food chain, then it needs to do it with no gaps in its armour – and the lack of an IP rating is a gap.

With the OnePlus 7 Pro, OnePlus has made a conscious decision to fight first on features, then on price. Previously it felt that OnePlus put price marginally before performance… here it is the other way around. While the price is notably higher than previous OnePlus handsets, that extra capacity has allowed the team to step up its game and design a handset that rivals the top tier from other manufacturers while still being seen as a competitively priced flagship.

For consumers more focused on price the OnePlus 7 is expected to be the direct successor to the OnePlus 6 and OnePlus 6T, and be in a similar price bracket. But if you are looking for the latest technology in a refreshing design, with the latest features and a strong history in software support, the OnePlus 7 Pro is fighting to be at the top of your list.

Now read more about OnePlus’ plans in my exclusive interview with co-founder Carl Pei…

Disclaimer: OnePlus supplied a OnePlus 7 Pro for review purposes.

Fortnite Downtown Drop: Where to hit any trickjumps on either the crane, elevated train, or fence – Fortnite Insider

Fortnite Downtown Drop: Where to hit any trickjumps on either the crane, elevated train, or fence – Fortnite Insider

Here’s where to complete the Downtown Drop “hit any trickjumps on either the crane, elevated train, or fence” Fortnite challenge.

Two new Fortnite Downtown Drop LTM challenges unlock each day, and two new challenges have recently unlocked. The two new challenges can be seen below:

  • Hit any of the trickjumps on either the crane, elevated train, or fence
  • Jump through all 6 flaming hoops

The jump through all 6 flaming hoops is pretty easy, the hoops can be spotted from afar, and it’s a straightforward challenge to complete. However, players may not know how to complete the “hit any of the trickjumps on either the crane, elevated train, or fence”. This is one of the rate challenges where players have the option of where to complete the challenge.

Where to hit any of the trickjumps on either the crane, elevated train, or fence

There’s a crane right at the end of the Fortnite Downtown Drop LTM map, right before the elevator. You’ll find the crane on the right hand side, which also has coins and a flaming hoop on it. In order to complete the trickjump, you simply need to slide on the crane. Here’s the crane in-game:

Trickjump on a crane
Trickjump on a crane

The elevated train can be found on the third slope, which comes after the two food trucks that are in the corner. You’ll need to gain speed, stick to the left hand side and use the tramp to get on top of the balcony, which you’ll then need to take a second ramp to get onto the platform where the elevated train is.

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There’s another ramp on the elevated train, which you just need to slide on and go over the elevated train. This is one of the harder ones, and as you only need to hit a trickjump on any three of the locations, it’s not recommended to do this one. Here’s the elevated train in-game:

Elevated train
Elevated train

The fence can be found at the bottom of the very first slope on the left hand side. It’s the fences for the basketball court. You’ll need to gain speed and stick to the left and try and utilize the ramp. You’ll need to slide on the fence in order to complete the trickjump. You can also use the impulse grenades to launch yourself onto the fence. Here’s the fence in-game:

Trickjump fence
Trickjump fence
7,500 boots are on display at Fort Bragg to honor US service members killed since 9/11 – Task & Purpose

7,500 boots are on display at Fort Bragg to honor US service members killed since 9/11 – Task & Purpose

More than 7,500 boots on display at Fort Bragg this month served as a temporary memorial to service members from all branches who have died since 9/11.

The boots — which had the service members’ photos and dates of death — were on display for Fort Bragg’s Directorate of Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation’s annual Run, Honor and Remember 5k on May 18 and for the 82nd Airborne Division’s run that kicked off All American Week.

“It shows the families the service members are still remembered, honored and not forgotten,” said Charlotte Watson, program manager of Fort Bragg’s Survivor Outreach Services.


The idea for the display came from similar ones at Fort Hood, Texas, and Fort Campbell, Kentucky. The first display at Fort Bragg was in Hedrick Stadium in 2014. It was organized by Fort Bragg’s Survivor Outreach Services and Fisher House.

Jonathan Lomax, who was in the Marines for 21 years, was among those who stopped to see the boots and pay his respects on May 17.

Though Lomax knows of Marines who died in combat, he said he hoped he didn’t recognize names on the boots as he strolled among the multiple rows on the field at Hedrick Stadium.

“Any loss of life is severe, so all of these are my brothers and sisters,” Lomax said. “That’s the way I look at it.”

Memorial at Fort Bragg: 7500 boots to honor the fallen

(U.S. Army/Pfc. Hubert D. Delany III)

A collection of boots, each with the photo of a fallen service member, are aligned at memorial display at Fort Bragg, N.C., May 19, 2019


He paused to reflect on what the boots symbolized.

“It means we’ve lost good soldiers, a lot of good service members fighting for this country,” he said. “And this is just recent. It’s not even the ones we’ve lost before (9/11) — a lot of young people.”

This was the fourth year that Beth Grimshaw volunteered to help set up the display.

One of the boots represented Dr. Mark Taylor, a lieutenant colonel who Grimshaw worked with at Womack Army Medical Center. He was a surgeon assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division Forward Surgical Team.

Taylor was killed during a rocket attack on March 20, 2004, in Fallujah, Iraq.

“I’ve got some friends’ husbands who are out here,” said Grimshaw, who paused to reflect on May 17. “I’d like to see this out so they’re not forgotten.”

Heading into Memorial Day, Watson said the boots were on display to serve as a reflection of the sacrifices that all military branches have made.

“The true meaning of Memorial Day is not picnics and barbecues, though those are great things, the meaning is paying tribute,” she said.

———

©2019 The Fayetteville Observer (Fayetteville, N.C.). Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

SEE ALSO: A Fort Bragg Drop Zone Has Become Hallowed Ground For Some Paratroopers

WATCH NEXT: That Time The Air Force Dropped A Humvee On Fort Bragg

(U.S. Army/Pfc. Hubert D. Delany III)

Group Calls In Duo Are Now Live For All – Chrome Unboxed

Group Calls In Duo Are Now Live For All

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Duo – the yin to Allo’s failed yang in Google’s messaging strategy from a few years ago – has not only amassed a wide audience of users over the past couple years; it has also managed to keep them around. Apple’s iMessage and Facetime still dominate the US landscape and Allo failed to the point of being fully shut down, but Duo has emerged as a popular and useful cross-platform video messenger even while missing a key feature: group calls.

Over the past few weeks, Google has been slowly rolling out the group call feature and as of yesterday, they have made it available across the board for Android and iOS users. With that, it becomes pretty clear that the web client (which is the best version for Chromebook users) isn’t on that list, but I’d wager it won’t be too long before that happens as well.

The entire thing works just as you’d expect and to place a group call, you simply need to select “create group,” select the contacts, and then initiate the call. A nice feature is the fact that those groups stick around after the call is done and stay up with your frequent contacts for quick, one-touch group calls in the future.

The calls are limited to 8 participants and simply divides the screen more and more as additional callers join the group. I personally prefer the Hangouts method of showing the person speaking in full screen while showing everyone else in the room in a small window at the bottom or side, but maybe that will be a feature for down the road. For now this is a great way to call up a few people at once if you want to video chat.

When the web client updates with this feature, we’ll be sure to keep you all updated.

Tested: Apple’s updated 2019 MacBook Pro butterfly keyboard – AppleInsider

Tested: Apple’s updated 2019 MacBook Pro butterfly keyboard – AppleInsider

 

Video

By Andrew O’Hara

Saturday, May 25, 2019, 01:02 pm PT (04:02 pm ET)

Apple made it a point to tell users that the new MacBook Pro has a material change, and has a more reliable keyboard. We put the new updated third-generation keyboard to the test to see how the sound, type, and feel compared to the previous generation and break down exactly what Apple has changed that makes a difference for users day-to-day.

2019 MacBook Pro


2019 MacBook Pro

What’s changed

Apple has remained mum surrounding these changes so we are left with third-party analysis on what they specifically are. In traditional fashion, iFixit was one of the first with an in-depth breakdown of these keys and reporting what they found. The whole mechanism has remained the same with two notable changes.

First is the metal dome switch, the part that actually makes the clicking feeling when you press down on a key cap. They have slightly different appearances on the outside which could be something as minor as switching manufacturers or it could be a new heat treatment as iFixit has theorized.

Should this dome be damaged, a key would start to act erratically or not at all.

2018 key membrane (left) & 2019 key membrane (right)


2018 key membrane (left) & 2019 key membrane (right)

Secondly, there’s the gasket that sits within the switch and focuses the pressure from a keypress centrally onto the dome switch. In all previous generations, this material was semi-opaque and had the soft, tacky feel of silicone. The updated switch design has a more translucent membrane, with a material shift to a form of nylon.

In speaking to material scientists, and other hardware engineers, we suspect that the tackiness of the silicone in the 2018 keyboard may cause debris to stick in place, similar to how pocket lint adheres to the outside of an iPhone case made out of similar material. By switching to nylon, which does have a higher propensity for static, dust may not stick in-place as easily as before.

But, the clearances between materials are the same. The overall design of the key, the butterfly mechanism, and the contacts are the same. At present, it appears that the change may make it easier for Apple to perform maintenance in-store, and may cut down on total replacements of the upper case, which includes the speakers, the keyboard, the battery, and the case metal.

If the changes helps to keep customers out of the Genius Bars remains to be seen.

Look, sound, and feel

From the outside, the new MacBook Pro keyboards look identical to their 2018 counterparts. With those changes on the inside, we were curious about how they would change the typing feel or sound of they keyboard.

We pulled out our 2018 MacBook Air which has the original third generation keyboard design —complete with silicone barrier —as the 2018 MacBook Pros and typed the same phrase on each to see how they felt and sound.

2019 MacBook Pro


2019 MacBook Pro

Largely, there was no difference. You can hear in the video for yourself but the newer model has a slightly lower pitch than the MacBook Air. This is partially due to the difference in density and weight of the two machines and there was no change in the actual clickiness or overall sound.

If anything, the new keyboard was slightly softer to type on which could be attributed to either of the two material changes outlined above, or even just a new keyboard with several hundred thousand fewer words on it.

If you were comfortable and happy typing on the previous butterfly keyboards, you will feel at home here.

Is it more reliable?

Apple seems to be tackling the perceived problems with its keyboard design head-on, but it’s not clear what the changes are actually going to do. They’ve expanded their repair program to now include the 2018 MacBook Pro and MacBook Air and are actively touting the new keyboards as having improved reliability.

AppleInsider’s own research has shown how small of an issue the keyboard problem really is, (though it is above the previous design’s average) and if Apple really did improve the reliability here then the number should fall even further. We’ll be speaking more about this in about six months, as we collect the data.

We will know over time if Apple’s new keyboards are any more reliable than before but at the moment all we can say is the sound, type, and perform the same and that there were, in fact, subtle changes in materials.

Where to buy

If you want to grab a new MacBook Pro which are showing some seriously impressive performance gains over last year’s models, you can pick them up now, with select models up to $200 off.

$150 off 2019 13″ MacBook Pros

$200 off 2019 15″ MacBook Pros

Investigation underway after shooting near Cambria – WSIL TV

Investigation underway after shooting near Cambria – WSIL TV

UPDATED: May 25, 2019 at 4:43 p.m.

WILLIAMSON COUNTY (WSIL) —  The Williamson County Sheriff has confirmed one of the victims died as a result of their injuries. The other is in critical condition. 

ORIGINAL STORY: 

WILLIAMSON COUNTY (WSIL) —  The Sheriff’s Office is investigating a shooting that injured two people Saturday morning. 

The Williamson County Sheriff’s Office says the shooting happened at a home in a rural area near Cambria. 

Two men were injured in the shooting. 

Police say the suspect is in custody.